An Interview with Author Mark E. Lacy

Recently I was interviewed by AC Cobble regarding my fantasy novel, The Ban of Irsisri. Here is a transcript of that interview:

AC:The Ban or Irsisri is in many ways a traditional epic fantasy with an epic quest, lots of action, and powerful sorcery. It’s also packed full of dream sequences, tribal rituals, and mysticism. Why did you decide to add those elements, and do they add to the story?
 
MEL: The mix of traditional elements of epic fantasy with elements of tribalism and mysticism was something that developed over time. I knew I didn't want my main characters to come from privileged backgrounds. Nor did I want them to emerge from serfdom. If you take Robert E. Howard's "Conan", for example, you have a hero who has great disdain for the trappings of "civilization" and who takes great pride in being labeled a "barbarian". I think Conan would enjoy sharing a mug of ale with the tribesmen in The Ban of Irsisri. As far as dreams and mysticism are concerned, I think some of the most profound stories in fantasy and science fiction have supernatural mysteries at their core. Forces we cannot fully comprehend, forces that transcend ordinary experience but nevertheless influence our values, our choices, our sense of destiny.
 
ACI love that you mention Howard’s “Conan”. I was thinking about that character when I read your book. You have a great sequence early in the novel where one of the tribesmen, Enkinor, enters a city and – spoiler! – runs into all kinds of trouble. In fantasy books, it’s always the dark forest that is full of threats. But in real life, it’s usually the cities where people get in trouble. What do you think is so appealing about the idea of a primal man from the wilderness facing off against a modern (well, more modern) world?
 
MEL: I’m pretty sure one could trace back Conan’s barbarism to the concept of the “noble savage.” But I also think “primal man from the wilderness” has an appeal because life in the wilderness, on the frontier, was simpler in many ways than the “modern” world. Not easier, but not as complicated. The threats to your survival in the wilderness are often better known. And perhaps the wilderness could be said to be less-populated by immoral distractions and temptations.
 
AC: The Ban of Irsisri stands out because of its vivid prose, and in some ways it reminds me of NK Jemisin – which is about the biggest compliment I can give a fellow fantasy author. Sorry if this is rude, but, how did a former corporate guy learn to write like that!?! Asking for a friend…
 
MEL: Asking for a friend? (laughs) We might stand your question on its head and ask, how did a fantasy writer survive Corporate America for thirty years? Seriously, I think that, to the extent my writing succeeds, it has a lot to do with reading and revision. Many successful writers have counseled new writers to read a lot and read broadly. And, over time, the more I read, the more I learned how good writers produced their work. And the more I learned, the more I went back to revise. And revise. And revise. I would set my work aside for a while and come back to it later with fresh eyes, only to discover, with chagrin, I had more work to do. 
 
AC: Tell us something no one else knows about Mark E Lacy or The Ban of Irsisri?
 
MEL: Only my junior high school English teacher knows that the fantasy story I wrote in ninth grade, which won first place in the school's literary contest, was a seed that would sprout and influence the scene, early in The Ban of Irsisri, when Enkinor and Strigin escape into the hills beyond the city of Kophid, only to face their pursuers and a forest fire of supernatural origin.